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Countries With A 9 May Celebration

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During the Soviet Union's existence, 9 May was celebrated throughout the USSR and in the countries of the Eastern Bloc. Though the holiday was introduced in many Soviet republics approximately between 1946 and 1950, it only became a non-labour day in Ukrainian (1963) and Russian (1965) SSRs. In the latter one, a weekday off (usually a Monday) was given starting 1966 if 9 May was to fall on a weekend (Saturday or Sunday).

The celebration of Victory Day continued during subsequent years. The war became a topic of great importance in cinema, literature, history lessons at school, the mass media, and the arts. The ritual of the celebration gradually obtained a distinctive character with a number of similar elements: ceremonial meetings, speeches, lectures, receptions and fireworks.

In Russia during the 1990s the 9 May was not celebrated massively, because Soviet-style mass demonstrations did not fit in with the way in which liberals who were in power in Moscow communicated with the country’s residents. The situation changed when Vladimir Putin came to power. He started to promote the prestige of the governing regime and history, national holidays and commemorations all became a source for national self-esteem. Since then the Victory Day in Russia has increasingly been turning into a joyous celebration in which popular culture plays a great role. The celebration of the 60th anniversary of Victory Day in Russia in 2005 became the largest national and popular holiday since the collapse of the Soviet Union.

Armenia has officially recognized 9 May since its independence in 1990. The holiday was similarly celebrated there while the country was part of the Soviet Union.

See also: [1915 NEVER AGAIN - THE ARMENIAN GENOCIDE]

Azerbaijan has officially recognized 9 May since its independence in 1991. The holiday was similarly celebrated there while the country was part of the Soviet Union.

Belarus has officially recognized 9 May since its independence in 1991 and considers it a non-working day. The holiday was similarly celebrated there while the country was part of the Soviet Union.

Poland officially recognized 9 May from 1945 until 2014. From 24 April 2015 Poland officially recognized 8 May as "Narodowy Dzień Zwycięstwa" - "National Victory Day".

See also: [Hitler Studies The Map During The Invasion Of Poland]

Bosnia and Herzegovina has officially recognized 9 May as the Victory Day over Fascism and considers it a non-working day.

British Channel Islands of  Jersey and  Guernsey were not liberated from German occupation until 9 May 1945, and  Sark on 10 May 1945, and celebrate those dates as their Liberation Days.

Georgia has officially recognized 9 May since its independence in 1991. The holiday was similarly celebrated there while the country was part of the Soviet Union.

German Democratic Republic recognized Tag der Befreiung (Day of liberation) on 8 May, it was celebrated as a public holiday from 1950 to 1966, and on the 40th anniversary in 1985. Only in 1975 the official holiday was 9 May instead and that year called Tag des Sieges (Victory Day).

Federal Republic of Germany does not officially recognize 9 May as a holiday. However, celebrations continue to take place in some areas of the former German Democratic Republic. Also, on 8 May, the German state of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern since 2002 has recognized a commemorative day Tag der Befreiung vom Nationalsozialismus und der Beendigung des 2. Weltkrieges (Day of Liberation from National Socialism, and the End of the Second World War).

Israel has celebrated for decades, although officially recognized 9 May since 2000. Parades are hosted in many cities across the country.

Kazakhstan has officially recognized 9 May since since its independence in 1991. It's a non-working day. The holiday is sometimes celebrated in connection with other national holiday on 7 May (Defender of the Fatherland Day). From 1947 the holiday was similarly celebrated there while the country was part of the Soviet Union.

Kyrgyzstan has officially recognized 9 May since its independence in 1991. The holiday was similarly celebrated there while the country was part of the Soviet Union.

Moldova has officially recognized 9 May since its independence in 1990. From 1951 the holiday was similarly celebrated there while the country was part of the Soviet Union.

Montenegro officially recognized 9 May as the Victory Day over Fascism as an official holiday.

The Russian Federation has officially recognized 9 May since its formation in 1991 and considers it a non-working day even if it falls on a weekend (in which case any following Monday will be non-working); The holiday was similarly celebrated there while the country was part of the Soviet Union.

Serbia celebrates 9 May as the Victory Day over Fascism but it's a working holiday. Still many people gather to mark the anniversary with the war veterans, including Serbian army, Minister of Defense and the President.

Tajikistan has officially recognized 9 May since its independence following the dissolution of the Soviet Union. The holiday was similarly celebrated there while the country was part of the Soviet Union.

Turkmenistan has officially recognized 9 May since its independence in 1991. The holiday was similarly celebrated there while the country was part of the Soviet Union.

Ukraine Officially recognized 9 May from its independence in 1991 until 2013, where it was a non-working day even if it falling on a weekend (in which case any following Monday was non-working). The holiday was similarly celebrated there while the country was part of the Soviet Union. In 2014, after the Russian military intervention in Ukraine, Ukraine joined the Baltic states in commemorating the end of World War II and the Victory in Europe Day on 8 & 9 May. Since 2015 Ukraine does officially celebrate Victory Day over Nazism in World War II on both May 8 and 9, per a decree of parliament.

USSR officially recognized 9 May from 1946 until its dissolution in 1991.

Uzbekistan has officially recognized 9 May from 1999, where the holiday was introduced as "Memorial/Remembrance Day". The holiday was also celebrated there while the country was part of the Soviet Union.

Russophone populations in many countries celebrate the holiday regardless of its local status, organize public gatherings and even parades on this day. Some multi-language broadcasting television chains translate the "Victory speech" of the Russian president and the parade on Red Square.

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Source: wikipedia
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